AZ-Envy - das etwas andere Micro Controller Board

In the 1990s, the well-known designer Luigi Colani asked why computers always have to be square and angular. He was right, they don't have to be. Not even our small micro controllers. The proof is provided by the new circular AZ-Envy, a micro controller board with the ESP8266-12F and two built-in sensors for environmental data, i.e. Envy from Environment and not from envy.

   


The gas sensor MQ-2 immediately catches the eye because of its explosion protection cover made of a dense stainless steel mesh. On the left side there is the ESP8266-12F with WLAN antenna and the built-in LED. The second sensor, top left in the picture, is a temperature and humidity sensor called SHT30. Otherwise you can see the µUSB socket for the power supply, to the right of it the voltage regulator, a yellow pin header and two buttons named RESET and FLASH - all in all a nice "physical computing platform" that can be programmed with the Arduino IDE. 

Of course, I want to try this micro controller board immediately and use the program Blink as usual. Since I have already used other ESP8266 micro controllers, I only need to select the board " Generic ESP8266 Module" in the Arduino IDE.


If you have not yet installed the ESP8266 family with the board administrator, you must enter the additional board administrator URL under "File/Preferences" in the Arduino-IDE:

http://arduino.esp8266.com/stable/package_esp8266com_index.json


Then open the management dialog under "Tools/Board/Board manager". Enter "ESP8266" in the search box and click on "Install" in the search result.

Then, under the Tools/Board tab, you will see ESP8266 and its various board designs. As I said: for the AZ-Envy, I immediately selected the top option "Generic 8266 Module".

What is noticeable about the image in the highlighted line? Correct: Despite the USB port for the power supply no port is shown at first. The AZ-Envy does not have a USB-Serial-interface due to lack of space. This is only needed for programming and - if desired - for data output in the serial monitor. I can use the FTDI, which I have used for the ESP8266-01 so far.

On closer inspection I see that the designations on the yellow connector strip match the pin designations of the FTDI. A technician told me that originally a female connector strip was planned here, into which the FTDI would be plugged directly. It’s a pity that this was not realized, so three jumper cables (female-female) for TX, RX and GND. The connectors DTR, CTS and VCC are not used. A special feature: Because the labelling was done in the same order as the FTDI, TX is connected to TX and RX to RX; not crosswise as usual with the UART interface. When the FTDI is connected to the computer, you will also get the port display (of the FTDI) under the Tools tab. Then you are ready to start.

With the first program blink I am interested in whether the AZ-Envy with its ESP8266-12F knows the name LED_BUILTIN; otherwise I would have to add the line "int LED_BUILTIN=2;" in the sketch, as with the ESP32. And how do I put the board into programming mode? 

Only pressing the FLASH key while uploading was not successful. The trick is: The FLASH key must be pressed when the power supply is established. Therefore first press the RESET button, then the FLASH button, then release RESET and finally release FLASH. This must be done at the latest when the Arduino IDE shows the dots after compilation that the connection should be established.


After uploading I have to leave the programming mode, so press RESET shortly.

Everything works at first go. LED_BUILTIN is recognized and the built-in LED next to the WLAN antenna flashes every second.

Next, I try the sensor SHT30. I don't need to connect anything here, it is connected internally. From the internet I learned that the sensor is connected via the I2C interface and has the hex address 0x44 (or 0x45 if necessary). The relative humidity should be measured with an accuracy of ±3% and the temperature with an accuracy of ±0.3°C. As usual in the Arduino world, I use an existing program library to read out the sensor. Recommended for the AZ-Envy is the library SHT3x

So put AZ-Envy back into programming mode (RESET, +FLASH, -RESET, -FLASH) and load a sample program installed with the SHT3x library.




Again, everything works immediately. The temperature display is a little too high and therefore the value of the relative humidity a little too low. This is quickly explained: Despite the cut-out in the circuit board, the ESP8266, the voltage regulator and the (heated!) gas sensor MQ-2 are in close proximity. The AZ-Envy shares this fate with all micro controllers that have a temperature sensor directly on the board. 

In this case you may have to compensate/calibrate, or you may be satisfied with the statement "much too cold" (danger of frost?) or "much too hot" (fire?, ventilation required?). I am planning a construction where I blow ambient air with a small PC fan towards SHT30 on the AZ-Envy and will report about it.

And finally, the gas sensor. The MQ-2 gas sensor is a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS), also known as a chemical resistor (chemistry actually without e at the end). MOS sensors measure the resistance change when gases are present. This type of sensor requires the gas to strike the sensor for a chemical reaction to occur, resulting in a change in resistance. 

The actual sensor for detecting the gas is located under the explosion protection cover made of a dense stainless steel mesh, which also serves as protection against dirt particles or other disturbing factors. This resistance change, related to a defined resistance value, results in an analog value, and thus it is clear where this sensor is connected, at input A0. For the evaluation the MQ-2 library from labay11  is recommended, which determines the gas concentration in ppm with simplified functions. The secret behind this remains hidden as long as we do not study the program library in detail. But that would go beyond the scope of this first consideration of the AZ-Envy.

After the installation of this library there is also a code example after installation:



After uploading, the following picture appears in the Serial Monitor:


Using the unknown algorithms, values for LPG, CO and smoke are determined. The number outlier at the bottom of the picture was the reaction to my breathing after a nice glass of rosé wine, otherwise the values in our living room after airing. Here, too, I will do further research, because basically the sensor is said to be non-gas specific, but it is very well suited for the detection of LPG, i-butane, propane, methane, alcohol, hydrogen and smoke.

This was my first examination of the new AZ-Envy, which was designed by a young developer (name is on the back) and realized with the help of AZ-Delivery. All in all a successful combination of a WLAN-capable microcontroller and two very good sensors, and the whole thing very nicely placed on a round board with less than 5 cm diameter.

The links to the program code are linked to the respective image.

And here the article as download.

Esp-32Produktvorstellungen

35 comments

Ralf Helmle

Ralf Helmle

@Maurice Hildebrand:
Da yaml ja extrem pienzig mit führenden Leerzeichen ist, würde ich mich über eine Bereitstellung deiner Konfiguration für ESPHome als Datei freuen, vielleicht könntest Du die irgendwo bereit stellen. Mit Copy/Paste habe ich Deine Konfiguration nicht zum Laufen bekommen. Danke.
Gruß
Ralf

Bernd Albrecht

Bernd Albrecht

@ Lui: An dieser Stelle kann ich nur die wichtigsten Tipps wiederholen:
1. Die Datenverbindung zum Hochladen und für den Seriellen Monitor funktioniert nur über die sechspolige Steckerleiste und dabei wird (anders als sonst üblich) Tx mit Tx und Rx mit Rx verbunden.
(Der Entwickler hatte eine Federleiste geplant, in die der USB-Seriell-Adapter eingesteckt wird).
Die Micro-USB-Buchse dient nur der Spannungsversorgung.
2. Den Temperatursensor bitte mit einem I2C-Scanner ausprobieren. Wenn keine I2C-Adresse angezeigt wird, ist der Sensor oder irgendein Kontakt ggf. nicht in Ordnung. In dem Fall bitte an den Kundendienst wenden.

Lui

Lui

Hallo an alle,
eine super Anleitung.
Leider läuft es bei mir genau wie bei Maciej. Der Gassensor funktioniert ohne Probleme. Doch der SHT30 zeigt nur Error bzw Nullen an. Habe zwei Boards ausprobiert, um einen Defekt auszuschließen. Ebenso jeweils mal die Libary WEMOS_SHT3X und SHT3x, mit 0×44, 0×45 und auch ohne Adressangabe ausprobiert. Immer der selbe Effekt, nämlich Null.
Woran kann das liegen?
Beste Grüße,
Lui

Rainer Sins

Rainer Sins

Hallo Herr Bernd Müller,
danke für den tipp mit den Librarys anpassen (wire vs. wire1). Ich hatte schon an mir gezweifelt… Nun habe ich etwas wichtiges gelernt: Wie man fehlerhafte Libraries repariert, bzw. wo diese zu finden sind.
Viele Grüße
Rainer

Mrt

Mrt

sensordaten abfragen klappt nicht .
Sketch lässt sich nicht kompilieren.
/home/pi/Arduino/libraries/SHT3x/SHT3x.cpp:537:5: error: ‘Wire1’ was not declared in this scope; did you mean ‘Wire’?
537 | Wire1.beginTransmission(_Address);
| ^~~~~
| Wire

Dirk Pieper

Dirk Pieper

@Dieter Müller,
ich verstehe deine Druck Probleme nicht. Dann dreh doch den Deckel. So ist die Wulst oben. Stützen vom Druckbed aus und gut (für den überstehenden Rand)…..die lassen sich dann entfernen. Ich hätte den Deckel in 5 Minuten neu konstruiert…brauche ich aber nicht.
@all,
das Gehäuse ist Top. Ich überlege mir noch, ob ich mir einen zweiten Deckel mit Ausschnitt für ein 0,96 Zoll Oled konstruiere…und das Oled Parallel auf den I²C Bus schalte. Bei mir läuft Tasmota drauf und ist via MQTT mit iobroker verbunden…

Maurice Hildebrand

Maurice Hildebrand

Falls jemand das über ESP-Home mit Homeassistant nutzen möchte, sende ich euch meine Konfiguration:

#===================
substitutions:
device_name: envy_1
device_friendly_name: “Envy 1”
ip_address: 192.168.178.190

esphome:
name: ${device_name}
platform: ESP8266
board: d1_mini

wifi:
ssid: !secret wifi_ssid
password: !secret wifi_pswd

manual_ip: static_ip: ${ip_address} gateway: 192.168.178.1 subnet: 255.255.255.0 ap: ssid: “Fallback ${device_friendly_name}” password: !secret fb_wifi_pswd

captive_portal:

logger:
baud_rate: 0

api:
password: !secret ota_pswd

ota:
password: !secret ota_pswd

#===================
time:
– platform: homeassistant
id: homeassistant_time

#===================

i2c:
sda: D2
scl: D1
scan: False

sensor:
– platform: sht3xd
address: 0×44
temperature:
name: “${device_friendly_name} Temperature”
humidity:
name: “${device_friendly_name} Humidity”
update_interval: 60s
– platform: adc
pin: A0
name: “${device_friendly_name} Gas”
filters:
– multiply: 100
unit_of_measurement: “%”
update_interval: 60s
icon: “mdi:percent”

Bernd Müller

Bernd Müller

@H. Lühken
Hallo Herr Lühken schon mal wie oben im Text angegeben
“Eine Besonderheit: Weil man sich bei der Beschriftung an die Reihenfolge beim FTDI gehalten hat, wird TX mit TX und RX mit RX verbunden; nicht wie bei der UART-Schnittstelle sonst üblich über Kreuz” probiert?
Das war bei mir der Fehler, danach lief es.
Ach ja, in der “wire” Bibliothek ist TwoWire Wire1; nicht definiert, dadurch kam es bei mir beim Übersetzen mit dem SHT30 Beispiel immer zu folgendem Fehler:
error: ‘Wire1’ was not declared in this scope; did you mean ‘Wire’?
Nach dem Einfügen der entsprechenden Einträge in wire.h und wire.cpp ging dann auch das Übersetzen…
Gruß
Bernd

H. Lühken

H. Lühken

Hallo,
bei mir klappt das Flashen des Envy einfach nicht. GND, RX und TX sind mit dem FTDI232 von AZ verbunden, Strom an der Mikro-USB-Buchse, Arduino-IDE 1.8.13, Bibliothek ist eingebunden, Port aktiv, aber trotz der Reihenfolge “RESET drücken und halten, FLASH drücken und halten, RESET loslassen, FLASH loslassen” kommt stets nur die Fehlermeldung “Failed to connet to ESP8266: Timed out waiting for packet header.”
Hat jemand noch eine Idee?

Maciej

Maciej

Hallo

Bei mir funktioniert der Gassensor ohne Probleme, leider kriege ich lauter Nullen auf dem serial monitor für die Temperatur und Feuchte. Ich habe es mit der Bibliothek SHT3x ausprobiert, und dort mit Simple_operation.ino. Sicherheitshalber habe ich den Sensor einmal ohne Adresse, aber auch mit SHT3x Sensor(0×45); und SHT3x Sensor(0×44); ausprobiert, hilft leider alles nicht. Hat jemand dafür eine Lösung?

Bernd Müller

Bernd Müller

Hallo,
hat eigentlich schon jemand den Deckel des zugehörigen Gehäuses gedruckt?
Wenn ich diesen auf den Rücken lege, ist der kleine Wulst auf der Oberseite kontraproduktiv fürs Drucken..
Wenn ich ihn normal hinlege wird von meinem Slicer nicht genügend Stützstruktur erzeugt um ihn richtig zu drucken.
Hat jemand schon mal versucht den Wulst auf der Oberseite im stl File zu entfernen oder gibt es eine Datei wo dieser nicht drauf ist?
Würde mich über Unterstützung freuen.
Gruß
Bernd

Jürgen

Jürgen

@ Werner Schoepe
Ihr Problem liegt, denke ich, an der Tatsache, dass beim Löschen und Flashen
von MicroPython via uPyCraft die Tastenfolge RST + Flash RST -Flash
zweimal erfolgen muss. Einmal beim Löschen des Speichers und
das zweite Mal beim eigentlichen Flashvorgang. Danach RST drücken und
die serielle Schnittstelle neu verbinden, das war’s. Übrigens die serielle
Schnittstelle können Sie angeschlossen lassen, wenn Sie ein MicroPython-Programm
auf dem Envy starten. Sie brauchen die Schnittstelle ja für die Terminalausgaben.
In dieser Hinsicht reagiert der Envy nicht anders als jeder ESP8266-Typ.

Das Problem ist halt auf dem Envy die fehlende Flashautomatik, die man heute
schon fast bei allen ESPs gewohnt ist.

Hier finden Sie die Module, die ich für meine Tests verwendet habe:
https://github.com/labay11/MQ-2-sensor-library/archive/master.zip
https://github.com/rsc1975/micropython-sht30/blob/master/sht30.py

Werner Schoepe

Werner Schoepe

Hallo Elektronik Freaks,
meine AZ-Envy läuft nun prima mit der Arduino IDE und C.
Der beim Start eines hochgeladenen Programms darf die serielle Schnittstelle nicht mit dem envy verbunden sein. Dann läuft das Programm auch brav bei drücken von Reset los!
Nun möchte ich das Board gerne mit MicroPython betreiben. Aber das Flashen von Python will nicht klappen.
Der erste Schritt “Erase Flash” mit uPycraft scheint noch zu funktionieren. Dann bekommt man einen Timeout beim schreiben… Hat jemand schon mal den AZ-Envy mit Python betrieben? Ist dies grundsätzlich möglich?
Gruß aus Düsseldorf!

Werner Schoepe

Werner Schoepe

Hallo Elektronik Freunde,
der blog hat mir sehr geholfen den Envy zum blinken zu bringen. Nun soll er auch “autonom” blinken.
Ich versoge ihn über den USB-Stecker mit Strom und dann drücke ich die Reset-Taste. Dann sollte er doch loslaufen und blinken? Tut er bei mir aber nicht!
Wenn ich zusätzlich die USB2Serielle Schittstelle in den Computer stecke und dann Reset drücke läuft er los. Wenn ich die Schnittstelle aus dem Rechner herausziehe läuft er brav weiter. Aber das kann es ja nicht sein. Wie macht Ihr das? Was mache ich falsch?
Danke für hilfreiche Tips im Vorraus!

makerMcl

makerMcl

Ergänzung: der “unbekannte Algorithmus” arbeitet mit den Widerstandsverhältnissen der unterschiedlichen Gase. Die Messung basiert darauf, das beim initialisieren (Methode setup()) sich der Sensor in normaler (frischer/reiner) Luft befindet. Das Datenblatt gibt verschiedene Kennlinien für die Gase an (Obacht – die Diagramme dort nutzen logarithmische Skalen).

Dieter Möller

Dieter Möller

so, jetzt ist mir gelungen die Daten (Temperatur, Humidity, Gas) vom AZ Envy auf meinem Nextion Display dazustellen. An Tx, Rx und Masse verbinden und einige Nextion-Befehle im Sketch, dann gings.
Wichtig für die Darstellung der Temperatur war das: float Temp = Sensor.GetTemperature(SHT3x::Cel); da hab ich lange für gebraucht, bis das raus hatte.
MfG.
Dieter

Dieter Möller

Dieter Möller

Danke für die obigen Ausführungen. Haben auch mir beim Flashen geholfen. Wie krieg ich denn ein Display an den AZ Envy angeschlossen? Die Werte nur auf dem seriellem Monitor der IDE zu sehen ist mir zu wenig. Vorzugsweise würde ich gerne einen Nextion verwenden. Ich habs versucht, Nextion an TX und RX angesclossen. Funktioniert nicht.
MfG.
Dieter

Rainer Beckmann

Rainer Beckmann

Zu Tastmota hier die Info wie man die Anzeige des Gassensors auf 3 Stellen bringen kann.
Über die Konsole muß man folgenden Befehl eingeben: adcparam1 6,0,1023,0,10000
Damit wird die Anzeige 3-stellig. Für 4 Stellen wird die 10000 auf 100000 gesetzt.
Beim mir werden die Werte des SHT3x nicht an den Smarthome-Server weitergereicht. Hat da jemand einen Tip?

Manfred

Manfred

Hallo,
an einer Tasmota Lösung wäre ich auch interessiert. Gibt es schon Erfahrungen?
LG Manfred

Thomas Hasseler

Thomas Hasseler

Es wäre schön, wenn es für den MQ-2 Sensor eine Konfiguration für ESPhome gäbe.
Hat schon jemand das unter ESPhome zum laufen gebracht….?

Bernd Albrecht

Bernd Albrecht

Wenn man SHT30 & github googelt, wird man zur Seite
https://github.com/Risele/SHT3x
geleitet. Dort auf dem grünen Feld „Code“ (pull-down-Fenster) bitte Download ZIP anklicken. Diese ZIP-Datei verschiebt man in den Unterordner libraries.
Dann unter Sketch/Bibliothek einbinden/.ZIP-Bibliothek hinzufügen… wählen.
In dem Fenster des Datei-Managers suchen Sie dann die neue ZIP-Datei im Ordner libraries und binden sie in der IDE ein. Anschließend ist ein Neustart erforderlich.
Nach dem Neustart der IDE findet man einen Menüpunkt SHT3x-master unter Datei/Beispiele und in unserem Beispiel-Sketch sollte die Befehlszeile mit „include“ funktionieren.
In einem Beispiel-Sketch wird alternativ die Bibliothek von WEMOS benutzt. Geht genauso.

A. Freudenstein

A. Freudenstein

Versuche den Envy einzubinden. Die Arduino IDE meldet auch, dass ein 8266 generic board eingebunden ist. Danach versuche ich verzweifelt, unter Beispielen den Sketch für SHT3x master zu finden.
Wird bei mir nicht angezeigt, sondern es kommen nur die Standard-Funktionen und keine, wie in der Beschreibung angegeben z.B. PUBSubClient (oben) oder XPT2046 Touchscreen (unten).
Frage: Wo liegt der Fehler, den ich mache und wie bringe ich den ENVY zum Laufen?
PS: Ich benutze die IDE-Version 1.8.13

Wolfgang Sombeck

Wolfgang Sombeck

ich habs so probiert:
https://templates.blakadder.com/az-envy.html
Bin auch auf den TX-TX und RX-RX reingefallen, aber jetzt ist Tasmota drauf, aber mit dem Template aus dem Link wird nur ein zweistelliger Wert aus dem AD0 angezeigt. Hat jemand schon mehr Erfahrungen mit Tasmota gemacht?

Björn

Björn

Hallo,

ich habe die oben genannten Schritte befolgt, bekomme jedoch keine Verbindung hin.
Kann mir jemand den Ablauf mit der FTDI Programmierung/Schnittelle erklären? Welche Adapter benötige noch?

Danke.

Steve Schneider

Steve Schneider

Vielen Dank für diesen hervorragenden Blog Beitrag. Meine ersten Gehversuche mit diesem Board wären ohne Ihren Blog Beitrag nicht möglich gewesen. Es scheiterte bereits am flashen. Warum die Pin Leiste zum flashen nicht voll beschaltet ist, muss man vermutlich wirklich nicht verstehen. Dies war der erste Stolperstein. Vcc auf der Pin Leiste ist offenbar nicht verdrahtet. Man benötigt also unbedingt neben dem Anschluss des Programmers den Anschluss via MicroUSB mit 5V. Dann war es nicht möglich in den Flash Modus zu gelangen. Die vorhandene Dokumentation enthielt lediglich den Hinweis, dass man zuerst die Reset Taste und dann die Flash Taste drücken soll. Allerdings war dies nur die halbe Miete. Reset drücken, Flash drücken, Reset loslassen, Flash loslassen ist die korrekte Vorgehensweise, um den Flash Modus zu erreichen. Dies muss unbedingt die in Handbücher einfließen. Dritter und letzter Stolperstein war dann die Tatsache, dass RX und TX nicht vertauscht werden dürfen (wie bei UART) und dann funktionierte endlich alles. Sowohl Tasmota, als auch ESPEasy funktionieren mit diesem Board. Ebenfalls hilfreich wäre die Angabe, dass der ESP-12F 4MB Speicher mtibringt. Dies erfährt man leider auch nicht aus den Unterlagen, sondern aus anderen Quellen im Internet.

Steve Schneider

Steve Schneider

@Sören Hellwege: Der Entwickler des Boards (Niklas Heinzel) schrieb in einem anderen Board am 24.11.2020: “The gas sensor is connected to ADC/A0 and the HDC1080 to I2C (SDA = GPIO4, SCL = GPIO5, I2c-Adress 0×44).”

Quelle: https://www.pcbway.com/project/gifts_detail/ESPEnvi___Environment_sensors_development_board.html

Warum hier vom HDC1080 gesprochen wird, ist mir nicht ganz klar, da als Sensor beim AZ-Envy Board ein SHT30-DIS-B verbaut ist. Ich würde aber darauf tippen, dass die gleichen GPIOs verwendet wurden.

Miguel Torres

Miguel Torres

Buena explicación del funcionamiento. Si como se dice en los comentarios, el sensor de gas interfiere en la lectura de la temperatura, la solución una solución puede estar en el diseño de la carcasa, dejando una separación física. Parece un módulo interesante para detector de fuego y humos.

Jos

Jos

vielen Dank für den Beitrag. Klar erklärt, simpel gehalten, genau richtig. Sicherlich kann man über Feinheiten diskutieren, aber diese Platine zeigt was mit geringem Einsatz erreicht werden kann.

Ich musste zwar überlegen warum “Smoke” nach dem Anhauchen so hoch geht, da ich doch vor 15 Jahren aufgehört habe zu rauchen ….
Auch hatte ich vor 40 Jahren mal ein Auto welches ich mit LPG Gas betanken konnte.

Egal, ich bin zufrieden und werde mit dieser Basis weiter experimentieren.

LG

Jens Unterkötter

Jens Unterkötter

Kleiner Tipp am Rande. Die Platine senkrecht mit dem SHT30 nach unten anbringen. So wird die gemessene Temperatur nicht von anderen Bauteilen auf der Platine beeinträchtigt. Warme Luft zieht immer nach oben.

Sven Waibel

Sven Waibel

Ich habe mir gleich drei Teile bestellt und der Gasdetektor direkt neben dem Temperatursensor ist echt mies gelöst. Dadurch dass der Gasdetektor so eine Wärme abstrahlt, ist die Termperaturmessung total verfälscht. Der Temperatursensor hätte man als erste Maßnahme ans andere Ende der Platine machen müssen oder gleich auf die Rückseite. Klar kann man jetzt einen Plastikstreifen dazwischen fummeln, aber das ist nicht Sinn der Sache. Werde mir wohl ein Gehäuse drucken mit einer Abtrennung, mal sehen wie weit das hilft.
Das eBook ist eigentlich noch für die Katz, da sind die Infos in diesem Blog 1000x hilfreicher, danke dafür. Ins Buch sollte alle Infos rein, damit ein Anfänger das Ding flashen und benutzen kann. Das erspart viel Support und beim Anwender Sucherei. Vielleicht sollte man von ArduinoIDE weg und lieber PlatformIO unterstützen, das meiner Meinung nach wesentlich besser ist.
Viele Grüße

Jürgen

Jürgen

@ Carsten Vom ESP8266 her gibt es keine Bedenken, mit 4MB Flash an Bord ist der MicroPython-tauglich. Der Gassensor arbeitet, so viel ich weiß, analog, also auch kein Problem an A0. Und ein Modul für den SHT30 in MicroPython gibt es hier: https://github.com/rsc1975/micropython-sht30/blob/master/sht30.py. Dafür ist dann wichtig, an welchen Pins der SHT30 liegt: SDA = GPIO4, SCL = GPIO5, I2c-Adresse 0×44.
H.-J. Winter

H.-J. Winter

Danke für die einführenden Hinweise. Um die Wärmestrahlung des Gassensors zu reduzieren einen schmalen Plastestreifen dazwischen schieben. 3 bis 4 mm Höhe dürften reichen.

Carsten

Carsten

Hat schon jemand Erfahrung, das Teil mit MicroPython zu nutzen? Sollte doch problemlos möglich sein, oder?!

Bernd Albrecht

Bernd Albrecht

@ S.Helllwege: Die Sensoren des AZ-Envy sind intern angeschlossen. Wie Sie richtig vermuten: der MQ-2 an A0 und der SHT-30 an I2C.
Man benötigt beim SHT-30 weder die Pin-Nummern für SDA und SCL noch die I2C-Adresse. Mit den Zeilen
#include
SHT3x Sensor;
ist schon alles getan, was man benötigt, um den SHT-30 abzufragen.

Sören Hellwege

Sören Hellwege

Hallo,
ich interessiere mich für den AZ-Envy und möchte ihn anschließend mit tasmota flaschen.
Der MQ-2 kommt an den A0, aber welche GPIO brauche ich für I2C?
Dankeschön

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published

Recommended blog posts

  1. Install ESP32 now from the board manager
  2. Lüftersteuerung Raspberry Pi
  3. Arduino IDE - Programmieren für Einsteiger - Teil 1
  4. ESP32 - das Multitalent
  5. OTA - Over the Air - ESP programming via WLAN